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Updates to AOA Board Certification help create a seamless process for DOs

Thursday, March 22, 2018

Progress continues with the realignment of AOA Board Certification to improve the user experience for applicants and diplomates. This complex process requires multiple infrastructure changes that will adapt board certification to meet members’ expanding technology expectations.

With the transition to a single GME accreditation system more than halfway completed, AOA Board Certification is improving and evolving its certification programs to help DOs affirm their integral osteopathic identity, says Daniel G. Williams, DO, AOA vice president of certifying board services.

“We also want osteopathic continuous certification (OCC) to maintain our osteopathic distinctiveness, to be cost-effective and credible,” Dr. Williams says. “It needs to be a frictionless process that integrates into the lifestyle of physicians, rather than an extra burden.”

Here’s a breakdown of improvements in AOA Board Certification services:

  • The Certifying Board Management System (CBMS) offers an elevated user-experience with a streamlined online application, and online score reporting capabilities. In addition, physicians can participate in online CME activities and verify OCC status through the Physician Portal. Certifying Board Services also provides physicians with automated reminders regarding certification expiration.
  • The AOA is piloting new technology for oral exams using video technology for an Oral Exam Monitoring System to support psychometrically sound scoring. Video monitoring of exam sessions will ensure a fair and consistent process for examiners and applicants.
  • The new centralized certifying board certification website modernizes the online experience for all boards. The site features simple navigation, making it easier to find exam dates, hosted documents and OCC processes. All certifying board websites are being converted this year.

This article was originally published on The DO.